50 Shades of Grey in Photography Tips

Don’t worry this post is very safe for work. You should probably get to work after this, just saying.

Not all black and white photos are created equal every photo shouldn’t be turned into black and white to increase its creative appeal.

_DSC0252

This photo is one of my favorite black & white because it still feels very soft and feminine yet it has a bold contrast. Leaning forward as if she is paying close attention to the speaker which is now you the viewer. However, with this being such a simplistic photo the viewer is the one paying the closest attention.

If the photo can look great as a black and white, then it’s likely that it is a good shot in color. Don’t force a shot by making it black & white.

That being said, black & white photos have a lot of shades of grey. There shouldn’t be 100% black and whites throughout the photo. I don’t particularly have a set style when it comes to black & white photography. I would suggest use the style to support the story you want to tell.

14191927_10155229940704502_3288833879572895891_n

This was a photo taken on a blue wall in my room. I added some selective contrast and clarity and I think it made this photo simple yet told some time of story without showing an over-the-top expression.

Tip of the day

This comes in handy for any type of shoot. Check your histogram when you take a test shot. Looking at the photo on the screen that you have on that small LCD screen will tell you if you have things lined up but that histogram will tell you if the shadows or highlights is to far to one side.

There are options to show where the shadows are too dark or highlights too light and it will be blinking. At least that is how it appears on my Nikon. You lose information when the photo is too underexposed or to overexposed.

This tip will keep many new photographers from worrying about a photo that has great composition but bad quality.

Advertisements